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Monday, September 29, 2008

Celebrate Your Freedom to Read: Banned Books Week

It's Banned Books Week
Banned Books Week: Celebrating the Freedom to Read is observed during the last week of September each year. Observed since 1982, this annual ALA event reminds Americans not to take this precious democratic freedom for granted. This year, 2008, marks BBW's 27th anniversary (September 27 through October 4).

BBW celebrates the freedom to choose or the freedom to express one’s opinion even if that opinion might be considered unorthodox or unpopular and stresses the importance of ensuring the availability of those unorthodox or unpopular viewpoints to all who wish to read them. After all, intellectual freedom can exist only where these two essential conditions are met.

BBW is sponsored by the American Booksellers Association, American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression, American Library Association, American Society of Journalists and Authors, Association of American Publishers, National Association of College Stores, and is endorsed by the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress.
 [This is from the ALA's site]

I found this excellent YouTube video over at Blogher.  Here are the 100 most banned and challenged books from 1990 - 2000.  See any beloved books?  Award-winning books?  

Go now and celebrate your Freedom to Read. 
Read a banned book.

4 comments:

Nowheymama said...

Excellent! It's amazing what you can find on YouTube, isn't it?

PJ Hoover said...

I love this video! It's fantastic! Thanks for posting it, Vivian.
Happy Monday!

Ladytink_534 said...

I've read a good many of those books and I plan on reading The Witches soon for the first time too. I LOVE Roald Dahl!

Alkelda the Gleeful said...

I wonder if my 4th grade teacher got into trouble for reading Anastasia Krupnik aloud to us, because at a certain point, she stopped reading it to us, and I had to check it out of the library. At the time, "One Ball Reilly" just seemed like a funny name--I didn't know what it meant.