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Monday, October 22, 2007

Writing Exercise Entries

I wrote a post on Saturday about exploring different writing styles. Five brave souls decided to join me in this exercise. So, Sassy Lucy, Alkelda the Gleeful, Becky C., Christine M. and M. Thompson--since you were kind enough to share your talents, send your snail mail address to my e-mail address: hipwritermama at comcast dot net, and I'll send you a paperback copy of Gail Carson Levine's Writing Magic: Creating Stories That Fly. Edited to add: I forgot to mention, this book is geared to help young writers (Grade 5 and up) find their voice. I haven't read the book yet, but my feeling is that Gail Carson Levine knows how to identify what is important for young people. With that said, I think this book will probably help adult writers discover the right voice to appeal to the young.

Please note: these entries are the property of the authors. If any of you go on to write a manuscript from your entry...good luck!

Sassy Lucy:
Beneath the gnarly oak tree Christina and Tarabeth nestled as tightly as they could together. Once again their parents were arguing over everything and anything, and they could no longer take it, so they had sought shelter beneath the tree that had once held their childhood treehaven.

Elizabeth glanced towards the back of their old brick house, wishing they could go in. "Tarabeth," Elizabeth chattered, "do you see that small door over there?"
Tarabeth too noticed a glint of metal in the sun, she had never seen that before.
Slowly the girls crawled across the yard to the house. There, unbeknownst them before they found a silver finished door just waiting to be opened.

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Alkelda the Gleeful:
Kate and Moon-Pie found a dusty door. The door was behind the couch in Aunt Libby’s library. “I will have to crawl through the doorway,” Kate said. “You are short enough to walk through the door. Then I can see what is behind the door.”

“No,” Moon-Pie said. “I do not want to go.”

“We will have fun,” Kate said. “This is a secret passage. We will find gold. We will find shiny stones. We will find books with magic spells.”

“No,” Moon-Pie said. “We will find monsters. We will find meat-eating dinosaurs. We will find spiders.”

“Some spiders are nice,” Kate said. “Besides, we are prepared. I have a flashlight. You have silly putty. We are both brave. We will have the adventure of our lives.”

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Becky C.:
The sisters ran past the shaking trees then crept along the path, looking for the light that would show them back to the passage. It was getting dark, and the wildlife of the forest behind them were starting to get restless.

"Quick!" Mary said, pulling Rita through the bushes. "Let's rest here. Keep quiet and look around. Let's see if we can figure out where we are."

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Christine M.:
There couldn’t possibly be a more boring way to spend a beautiful fall day, Shelby thought to herself as she trudged up the basement stairs in her aunt’s house with yet one more box for Goodwill. Couldn’t her parents have chosen a rainy day to do this particular chore?

“Thanks, Shelby,” her mom said as she deposited the box in the driveway. “Can you help Kaylee in the cold room?”

Shelby shrugged. What was she supposed to say? No? Of course she would help her sister. When Shelby got to the cold room, Kaylee was surrounded by piles of linens.

“Oh – I’m glad you’re here. I don’t know if any of this stuff is considered good or not.” Kaylee said, and held up a finely embroidered handkerchief.

“That looks good. But who uses handkerchief’s anymore?” Shelby said and sat beside her younger sister.

“Of course it’s good.”

Both girls jumped at the unexpected voice behind them. Shelby, heart beating fast, turned slowly to see who could possibly be behind them, since the only door to the room was in front of them.

“I embroidered those myself.” It was a girl, not much older than Shelby, wearing very old fashioned long skirts.

“Who are you?” Shelby asked.

“Where did you come from?” Kaylee said at the same time.

“I’m Rita. I came from here – but sometime else. Want to come with me?” She beckoned with one finger, a slight smile on her face.

Anything was better than sorting out old handkerchiefs and napkins. Shelby and Kaylee nodded.

“Then follow me.”

And they followed her behind a shelf and back around – right back to where they had been. The room was the same room – but everything was different. There were herbs hanging from the ceiling and strings of onions, and there was a barrel of potatoes and a barrel of apples.

“Where are we?” Kaylee asked.

“Right where you were,” Rita answered.

“Then when are we,” Shelby asked.

Rita just grinned. “That is the question, isn’t it,” she answered.

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M. Thompson:
Cree-aa-k! Ann and Hope jumped.

"What was that?" Hope said.

"I don't know," Ann said, "let's go check."

The sisters started to walk up the stairs to the attic. Ann noticed a glimmer of light near the top stair that floated towards them. She nudged Hope.

The light shimmered then faded in front of them. Hope put out her hands to try to catch the last of the light. Her right hand caught on something solid. She pulled on it and a door opened into the staircase.

4 comments:

Christine M said...

It was fun to write a scene where I didn't have to worry about the back story - or how any of this connected with a plot or anything like that. Thanks for doing this.

Cloudscome said...

These are great! I haven't been keeping up with my blogging and I missed your challenge deadline. I will enjoy reading the entries though!

Alkelda the Gleeful said...

This challenge reminded me that if I ever did get back into writing manuscripts, I'd want to do Easy Readers. Whittling a story down to its bare essence and making it be vivid, compelling and plot-driven is more now interesting to me than writing a many-thousand word book. I think some of Cynthia Rylant's Mr. Putter and Tabby books are nothing short of brilliant.

Brian Mandabach said...

love these! very fun. and Christine M.--what a cliffhanger!